The euthyphro dilemma vs the divine command theory

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The euthyphro dilemma vs the divine command theory

The Euthyphro dilemma rests on a modernised version of the question asked by Socrates in the Euthyphro: Whichever way the divine command theorist answers this question, then, it seems that his theory will be refuted.

Philosophy of Religion » The Euthyphro Dilemma

This argument might be formalised as follows: The Euthyphro Dilemma 1 If divine command theory is true then either i morally good acts are willed by God because they are morally good, or ii morally good acts are morally good because they are willed by God.

The first premise of the Euthyphro dilemma presents two alternatives to the divine command theorist: The two options offered to the divine command theorist are intended to be logically exhaustive, so that if divine command theory is true then one of the options must be the case.

The divine command theorist is therefore forced to choose one of the options to affirm. This claim is supported by an argument known as the independence problem.

The euthyphro dilemma vs the divine command theory

Though critics of divine command theory disbelieve this premise, then, they can still use it against the divine command theorist. That this option is false follows from premises 2 and 3. The first claim is supported the emptiness problemand the second by the problem of abhorrent commands.

Again, this is used as a premise to which the divine command theorist is committed, rather than as a premise that the critic of divine command theory believes is true. Instead of the emptiness problem and the problem of abhorrent commands, the arbitrariness problem can be used to support it, if need be.

The euthyphro dilemma vs the divine command theory

Finally, 8 concludes that divine command theory is false. Premise 1 stated that if divine command theory were true then one of the two alternatives offered to the divine command theorist would also be true.

Divine Command Theory | Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy References and Further Reading 1.
Euthyphro dilemma - Wikipedia General form[ edit ] Various forms of divine command theory have been presented by philosophers including William of OckhamSt AugustineDuns Scotusand John Calvin. The theory generally teaches that moral truth does not exist independently of God and that morality is determined by divine commands.

The argument from 2 to 7 has, it is claimed, shown that neither alternative is true. It is therefore inferred that divine command theory is false.The most common argument against divine command theory is the Euthyphro dilemma. The argument gets its name from Plato’s Euthyphro dialogue, which contains the inspiration for it.

The Euthyphro dilemma is introduced with the question Does God command the good because it is good, or is it good because it is commanded by God? . The Euthyphro dilemma is introduced with the question Does God command the good because it is good, or is it good because it is commanded by God?

Each of the two possibilities identified in this question are widely agreed to present intractable problems for divine command theory. Divine command theory is widely held to be refuted by an argument known as “the Euthyphro dilemma”. This argument is named after Plato ’s Euthyphro dialogue, which contains the inspiration for the argument, though not, as is sometimes thought, the argument itself.

The divine command theory is the view of morality in which what is right is what God commands, and what is wrong is what God forbids. This view is one that ties together morality in and religion in a way that is very comfortable for most people, because it provides a solution to pesky arguments like moral relativism and the objectivity of ethics.

The Euthyphro dilemma is an objection to divine command theory introduced with the question, “Are morally good acts willed by God because they are morally good, or are they morally good because they are willed by God?” If the divine command theorist gives the second answer to the question, holding that good acts are good because God wills .

Philosophy of Religion » The Euthyphro Dilemma

Divine Command Theory. William of Ockham (after whom we name "Ockham's razor") (c. ) is an example of a later philosopher who advocated what later became known as "divine command theory": the view that the good is what God commands or wills.

Divine command theory - Wikipedia